Voters at Philip J. Abinanti in Morris Park were split about their experience with the voting machines as of the early afternoon. Some, including Christine Dente, 56, said that the machine gave her the error message that she scanned too many votes for the local councilman race. Dente said her vote counted the second time she scanned it.

Roseann Hendon, 60, said that after she scanned her ballot, she asked a poll worker for verification that the presidential candidate she chose was counted. "I would love to know if my vote of so-and-so was cast," she said. Hendon said the poll worker told her that the machine would reject her ballot if her vote didn't count, however, Hendon wanted more. "It would be nice if the Board of Elections could send a letter a week or two after the election confirming your choices," she said.

Other voters were concerned about the machines in general. "The print on the ballot is too small, that's where mistakes come in," said Zulma Villalba, 60. Christine Ulanski, 62, said the new machines were antiquated. "I've been voting for 40 years, and it was much easier voting with levers," she said.

Nicole Gallego, 69, said the scanning system told her that she voted. However, she said she had to do it twice because she didn't understand the "working family" option on the ballot and automatically chose Obama. A poll worker told her she made a mistake and had to redo her ballot. She wasn't concerned about her vote counting for Obama the second time she scanned it.

The voting process was seamless for many other voters leaving the poll site. Rushing past, Michael Schwartz, 37, said, "The language on the ballot was very clear, I had no problems at all."