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Talk/Lecture


Fri Oct
24
7:00p - 9:00p

Risky Talking with Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Eve Ensler

Presented by STREB and GRITtv.org


Hear: Eve Ensler, playwright/activist, and Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, law professor, with author/broadcaster Laura Flanders of GRITtv and action architect Elizabeth Streb. Experience: A unique action moment created for the event by STREB. Participate: Say what you think. Mental gymnastics. Place: SLAM (The Streb Lab for Action Mechanics) 51 N. 1st St. Williamsburg When: Friday, October 24, 7-9 p.m. Price: $10, $20 or ... ; you decide. Risky thinking guaranteed. Program subject to change. www.riskytalking.org co-produced by STREB and GRITtv.org
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Categories: Arts, Community, Programs


Sun Oct
26
11:00a - 4:00p

Founders Day

Presented by Barnard College


Barnard College presents a daylong festival celebrating its 125th anniversary.
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Categories: Arts, Programs, Theater


Sun Oct
26
3:00p - 4:30p

Securing Homeland: Rebounding/Rebuilding for a Sustainable Future

Presented by Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs


The panel, moderated by the curator, Margaret Mathews Berenson, will focus on innovative solutions to the problems of homelessness and displacement caused by catastrophic natural and manmade disasters that are dramatically presented visually in the works of art in the exhibition. Panelists will discuss innovative projects and proposals by artists, architects, non- profit organizations and government agencies around the world designed to provide housing for those in need. Among these are: post- Katrina housing in New Orleans and rebuilding efforts for victims of Hurricane Sandy in the New York area. Other topics of discussion will be: designing with sustainable materials; urban reclamation projects in Chicago, Houston and Detroit; collaborations between artists, urban design professionals and local communities; and social entrepreneurship in contemporary art and architecture. In conclusion, panelists together with audience participants will contribute ideas and recommendations for addressing these problems in the future. Handouts will include a list of organizations worldwide that provide meaningful solutions in the hopes that audience members might be inspired to assist them in meeting their goals. Brian Baer – Regional Program Coordinator, New York is the Regional Program Coordinator for Architecture for Humanity here in New York, where he is leading and managing the Hurricane Sandy Reconstruction program. He received his architecture degree from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC and is a LEED accredited professional and certified by NCARB. Baer has over 25 years’ experience of sustainable, community-aided design solutions for educational, cultural, civic and nongovernmental agency projects across the United States. He has collaborated with a wide variety of constituencies to bring consensus and success to the design and building process. Currently he is managing the ReNew NJ/NY Schools, ReStore the Shore, and authored the Resilience through Education and Design Centers programs. Cynthia Barton – Housing Recovery Program Manager is the Housing Recovery Program manager at the New York City Office of Emergency Management and Housing Recovery Program manager for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Regional Catastrophic Preparedness Grant Program. She holds a master of architecture from Yale, and was previously the managing director of Architecture for Humanity New York, and a contributing editor to the book, Design Like You Give a Damn: Architectural Solutions to Humanitarian Crises. Her disaster-relief work includes post-earthquake housing in India with Shigeru Ban and most recently overseeing the design and construction of a prototype for urban post- disaster housing in Brooklyn, NY. Deborah Gans, FAIA – Professor, Architecture School at Pratt Institute, and Principal, Gans Studio is Principal of Gans Studio and a professor of Architecture at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. The Gans Studio is known for its innovative “extreme housing” design prototypes for people displaced by homelessness, natural disasters and war. Their continuing work on alternative forms of shelters includes: disaster relief housing for Kosovo refugees; an interim housing system for the homeless commissioned by Common Ground; a community based planning and design project for post-Katrina New Orleans; and currently, a similar project in Sheepshead Bay post Super Storm Sandy. The Gans Studio prototype for a deployable Roll Out House (originally designed for refugee camps) was shown in Into the Open, an exhibition at the United States Pavilion in the 2008 Venice Biennial featuring civic-minded projects by contemporary architects. Among her many publications on landscapes of displacement are: Extreme Sites: Greening the Brownfield and essays in Beyond Shelter: Architecture and Human Dignity, Design Like You Give A Damn, and Expanding Architecture among others. She is a contributing editor for BOMB magazine and the Italian journal BOUNDARIES.
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Categories: Arts, Museums, Programs


Sun Oct
26
02:00p -

Author Talk: “Five Things You May Not Know About Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

Presented by Marymount Manhattan College (MMC)


Marymount Manhattan College (MMC) welcomes author Tina Santi Flaherty on Sunday, October 26 at 2:00 p.m. for a special discussion, “Five Things You May Not Know About Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis"
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Categories: Programs


Mon Oct
27
:p - 7:30p

The Board of Elections in the Digital Era

Presented by New York Law School


Discussion of the impact of technology on the voting process.
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Categories: Programs


Mon Oct
27
Tue Oct
28
7::00p - 8:00p

From Ghetto to Capella: Interfaith Exchanges in the Music of Baroque Italy

Presented by Salon/Sanctuary Concerts


Salon/Sanctuary Concerts presents a two-day lecture and concert event that explores the vibrant cross-fertilization between Jewish and Catholic musical cultures in Counter-Reformation Italy. Monday, October 27th 7pm Francesco Spagnolo Lecture at Greenwald Hall of Temple Emanu-El 1 East 65th St. between Fifth and Madison Tuesday, October 28th 6pm Concert at St. Paul's Chapel, Columbia University 1160 Amsterdam Avenue at 116th Street Lecture: Synagogue Songlines Jewish-Christian musical encounters in 17th and 18th-century Italy In the 17th and 18th centuries, the synagogues of the Italian Jewish ghettos of Venice, Mantua, Casale Monferrato, and Siena were the sites of musical performances that included sacred Hebrew texts set to music by Jewish and non-Jewish composers. The rise of art music in the Italian synagogues has been historically understood as a testimony to Jewish modernity, as a Jewish reaction to ghettoization, and as the birth of a Jewish musical aesthetics. By looking at Gentile involvement in Italian synagogue life, this lecture presents these important musical sources in an entirely new light. Francesco Spagnolo is the Curator of The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life and teaches in the Music Department at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the editor of Italian Jewish Musical Traditions (Rome-Jerusalem, 2006) and the co-author of The Jewish World (Rizzoli, 2014). Tickets for the lecture are $25, $15 for students, seniors, and members of EMA and are available on the Salon/Sanctuary website or by calling 1 888 718-4253. This event is free to members of Temple Emanu-El. Special thanks to The Temple Emanu-El Skirball Center for making this event possible. Concert: From Ghetto to Capella Jessica Gould, soprano & Noa Frenkel, contralto Grant Herreid, theorbo Pedro d'Aquino, harpsichord and organ The ghetto walls that separated Gentile from Jew in Counter-Reformation Italy were more porous than impenetrable, allowing for a rich musical dialogue and vibrant exchange of ideas throughout the baroque era. This concert explores the cross-fertilization of Jewish and Catholic musical cultures in the music of Benedetto Marcello, Francesco Durante, Barbara Strozzi, Salomone Rossi, and 18th century unaccompanied Hebrew chants. Also on the program are selections from the 1759 Hebrew language libretto of Handel's Esther, commissioned by the Jewish community of Amsterdam in the year of the composer's death. This program is a co-presentation of Music at St. Paul's Chapel of Columbia University and was originally developed with the generous support of the Archdiocese of Florence, Italy. Admission is free and open to the public.
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Categories: Programs


Mon Oct
27

ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCIATION, NEW YORK CITY CHAPTER HOSTS 27TH ANNUAL CHAPTER MEETING

Presented by Alzheimer's Assocation


“EARLY DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS AND PREVENTION STUDIES: NEW HOPE IN THE GLOBAL FIGHT AGAINST ALZHEIMER’S” Dr. Max Gomez, CBS 2 Medical Reporter, To Serve As Moderator
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Categories: Programs


Mon Oct
27

ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCIATION, NEW YORK CITY CHAPTER HOSTS 27TH ANNUAL CHAPTER MEETING

Presented by Alzheimer's Assocation


“EARLY DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS AND PREVENTION STUDIES: NEW HOPE IN THE GLOBAL FIGHT AGAINST ALZHEIMER’S” Dr. Max Gomez, CBS 2 Medical Reporter, To Serve As Moderator
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Categories: Programs


Mon Oct
27
7:00p - 10:00p

Where’s the Digital Street? Molly Sauter and Astra Taylor in Conversation with Felicity Ruby

Presented by Bloomsbury Publishing


Discussion of the current state of online activism, the role of technology in civil disobedience, and the potential of the internet as a zone of radical politics.
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Categories: Programs


Tue Oct
28
6:30p - 8:00p

“How’s the Revolution Going?” Rethinking Architectural Education from ‘68 to Today

Presented by Van Alen Institute


As the social movements and protests swept the country in the 1960s, architecture students played their part, and demanded that the walls of the academy be broken down to let the city in. In June of 1968, the National Institute of Architectural Education hosted an event asking how architects and architecture schools should respond to the urgent problems of the cities around them, and how to reform both architectural practice and architectural education. The issues they raised seem familiar to us today: Open storefront schools to engage neighbors, focus on multi-disciplinary approaches to social and ecological challenges, and use design thinking to address problems of every scale. Were the changes they fought for enough? What are the relevant issues architectural education needs to focus on today? Tickets: http://bit.ly/1w30CnZ Moderator: Anne Guiney, Director of Research, Van Alen Institute Participants: Peggy Deamer, Yale University and The Architecture Lobby; Quilian Riano, DSGN AGNC; Ron Shiffman, Pratt Institute; Kazys Varnelis, Columbia University GSAPP and AUDC Drinks will be served. This event is presented as part of "Celebrating 120 Years of Design at Van Alen," a series of public events based on the people, movements, and ideas that make up the rich and varied history of Van Alen Institute.
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Categories: Programs




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