City Limits Staff and Board

The publication is led by a talented and dedicated team of professionals, contributors, and volunteers, and funded by foundation support, advertising and subscription, and individual contributions from readers like you.

For information on joining our team and contributing to our new organization, visit our work for us page.

BOARD OF ADVISORS

  • Mark Edmiston
  • Chairman
  • Nomad Editions

  • Bob Herbert
  • Distinguished Senior Fellow
  • Demos

  • David R. Jones
  • President
  • Community Service Society

  • Steven L. Krause
  • Chief Operating Officer
  • Community Service Society

  • Elizabeth Cooke Levy
  • Non-Profit Manager
  • & Consultant

  • Mark E. Lieberman
  • Economist
  • Economics Analytics Research

  • Tom Allon
  • President
  • Manhattan Media

  • Eric Schrier
  • Independent Board Advisor

  • Frances Reilly
  • Chief Operating Officer
  • World Science Festival

  • Dan Rubin
  • Senior VP/Chief Financial Officer
  • Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

CITY LIMITS
ADDRESS:


  • CITY LIMITS
  • 31 East 32nd Street, 3rd floor
  • New York, NY 10016
  • 212-481-8484 extension 307


GENERAL CONTACT:


NEWS TIPS & SUBMISSIONS

ADVERTISING


ONLINE SERVICES


 

 

Nekoro Gomes


Image of Nekoro Gomes

Nekoro Gomes is the Director of Marketing & Operations for City Limits, and a former contributing writer. He is a native of Rochester, New York and graduated with a Bachelor of Science from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Evanston, where he specialized in magazine publishing. At Northwestern University, he was part of an editorial team that received a Society of Professional Journalist’s Award in 2005 for producing Blackboard Magazine, and he also served as an on-air producer at WNUR-FM, America’s largest student-run radio station. After completing his studies at Northwestern University in 2006, Nekoro moved to New York City, where he worked as a contributing writer with the nationally-published newspaper trade magazine, Editor & Publisher, as well as the community newspaper, The Greenpoint-Williamsburg Gazette. He also contributed writing to such publications as Left Turn Magazine and Beyond Race Magazine. In 2007, he was named as a George C. Stoney Fellow with the Wilmington, North Carolina-based documentary film consulting company, Working Films, where he helped to convene grant makers, educators, labor activists, and filmmakers to develop a marketing and outreach strategy for the documentary film, Greensboro: Closer to the Truth. At City Limits, he is responsible for engaging and building our audience, and support the organization’s business development initiatives, fundraising strategy, event partnerships, and editorial marketing efforts. In addition to his volunteer work on behalf of such New York-based organizations as South Bronx United and Minds Matter, Inc., Nekoro is currently pursuing a Master of Arts Degree in Media Studies from The New School, where he hopes to specialize in the academic areas of Media Management and the use of social media on behalf of social justice issues and nonprofits

Email: nekoro@citylimits.org

Articles, Investigations and Blogs

Blacks in Finance



The new decade brings fresh faces to nonprofits large and small and a host of city agencies - along with a major gap in state housing leadership.



A research report explains why NYC foster children languish so long without 'permanency.' Children's Services backs the findings and promises change.



Those with matters before Family Court and those who work there are hoping the state will grant this overburdened system more judges.



A bill before City Council would reveal the people behind each LLC.



The Hepatitis C virus often shows no signs for decades - and then might destroy your liver. Advocates are sounding the alarm for greater education and testing.



At the half-year mark of her new commissionership, Department for the Aging chief Lilliam Barrios-Paoli sits down for a Q&A.



New state funding increases are aimed at helping the poor and working poor -- but they're still behind.



Will low welfare rolls start reflecting the bad economy?



Amid a citywide plan to support a new model for child welfare, a foster parent serves as a recruiter and role model in her neighborhood.