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Articles, Investigations and Blogs

The city is doubling the fines for landlords who harass tenants and will publicize the names of property owners who get penalized. The only trouble is penalties are rarely imposed by judges.



The area's improvement—thanks to community action and city policy—is undeniable. What's debated is whether the same displacement seen in Bed-Stuy and Bushwick is headed that way.



Deadlier than HIV, the disease can appear years after infection, and testing and treatment are complicated. The city's Action Plan draws praise, but advocates want more resources applied.



President Obama and Democrats in Albany want a higher minimum wage. Among Brooklyn's low-wage workers, who will it help and how much?



The city says there was no post-Sandy rat explosion. But rats are still a major complaint in several neighborhoods, as experts say New York could do more to rebuff rodents.



Brooklyn leads the city in new cases of HIV, but changes in funding mean local prevention and treatment programs face obstacles in getting their message out.



Income inequality is rising around the globe, around the country and statewide. And despite its blue-collar rep, Brooklyn is one of the most polarized counties. Why is that? And why does it matter?



As tabloids celebrate an on-time state budget, a look at what one budget cut at the city level will mean: fewer childcare slots, less school prep for kids and a tough choice for their working parents.