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Gail Robinson


Image of Gail Robinson

Gail Robinson is a Brooklyn-based writer specializing in education and other public policy issues. She is the former editor in chief of Gotham Gazette.

Email: editor@citylimits.org

Articles, Investigations and Blogs

It's well known that wealthy kids outperform poor kids in school, but now the rich are also pulling away from middle-class students. Why? And is class or race the key factor in how NYC school kids perform?



How did income inequality become a driving issue in the 2013 race? What do the candidates actually propose to do about it? Would any of their ideas really work?



The DOE is planting seeds for charters to expand in city schools even after Mayor Bloomberg leaves office. But some of the new resources will only be open to those who won charter lotteries in the early grades.



The lavish last hurrah featured an hour-long riff on the Tonight Show, news of a new Coney Island concert arena and a scatological shot at the press.



The borough president famously erected signs declaring "How Sweet It Is!" to be in Brooklyn. Was there substance—and success—behind the shtick?



Originally launched to offer more choice to low-income parents in poorly served neighborhoods, charter schools are increasingly targeting more affluent students in areas that have lots of school options.



In the '60s it was an ambitious experiment in progressive education. Today John Dewey High graduates its final class after being closed as a failing high school. What led the Gravesend facility from success to shut-down?