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Suzanne Travers


Image of Suzanne Travers

Suzanne Travers is a freelance writer and reporter. She was previously a staff reporter for The Record/Herald News in Paterson, NJ, where she covered a variety of beats, including aging and senior issues, immigration, health, and municipal government. She has degrees in history from Brown University and McGill University.

Email: editor@citylimits.org

Articles, Investigations and Blogs

The city's library branches offer a dizzying array of services, from job-search help to literacy lessons to fiction writers' circles. But limits on space and money could hamper the systems' ability to reach potential.



Many of the city's branch libraries feature half-empty shelves, reflecting budget constraints more than changing readership demands.



Free access to technology, help for immigrants, a safe space for kids. Branch libraries play an increasingly important role. But funding hasn't kept up. Will the lack of support undermine a critical civic resource?



The neighborhood was a hotbed for defaults even before the superstorm's devastating flood. Now, advocates fear a flood of housing emergencies.



Whether it takes the form of financial scams, emotional mistreatment or physical harm, advocates for New York's aged say the extent of elder abuse in the city dwarfs the resources available to combat it.