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Rachel Blustain


Image of Rachel Blustain

Rachel Blustain is a journalist, social worker and editorial director of Rise, a publication written by and for parents affected by the child welfare system. Blustain was formerly the editor of Foster Care Youth United (now Represent), a magazine written by and for teenagers in the foster care system.

Email: editor@citylimits.org

Articles, Investigations and Blogs

There's growing interest in using supportive housing to help families whose children might otherwise end up in the foster-care system.



Burnout among child welfare workers hurts kids in foster care. In 2011, an effort was launched to give New York City caseworkers the support they need to stay on the job.



Child protection experts say false, malicious reports of abuse are not uncommon. Efforts to address the problem face complex challenges.



While some New York police agencies already avoid having kids witness a parent's bust and take steps to ensure care after Mom or Dad are detained, advocates say want more done to limit the effect of arrests and incarceration on children



For more than a decade national child welfare policy has encouraged timely adoptions as way to stabilize the lives of kids in foster care. But the system is challenged when a child's new home proves to be a bad fit.



Sixteen years ago the federal government put new pressure on states to facilitate adoptions. But it never bothered to track how many of those adoptions fail.



Adoption is a good outcome for many children in foster care. But not every adoptive parent-child combination is meant to be.



S.D. held out hope that her parents would bring her home. That never happened. But avoiding adoption was her choice—and it was a wise one, her lawyer says.



While there's disagreement among child welfare officials and advocates about all we can do to prevent broken adoptions, there is consensus on a few common-sense steps.