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Wayne Barrett


Image of Wayne Barrett

Wayne Barrett was a fixture at the Village Voice for almost four decades, doing his first investigative feature in 1973 and writing more than 2000 stories between then and 2011, when he left the paper. He has also written five books, including two on Rudy Giuliani, a biography of Donald Trump and City for Sale, a chronicle of the Koch scandals of the late 80s. He has been an adjunct at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism for years, teaching courses on investigative and political reporting, as well as advising students on investigative projects. He is the George Polk journalist in residence at Long Island University-Brooklyn and a fellow at the Nation Institute.

Email: editor@citylimits.org

Articles, Investigations and Blogs

Over his 22 years of post-mayoral life, Ed Koch proved he could transcend not only an electoral loss but a moral mistake, and rise, like his city, to a brighter morning.