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Dennis Walcott

DOE Head Says Funding Discrepancies Overblown

Meeting with parents in East New York, Chancellor Walcott said that while the state was still shortchanging the city, inequities in city funding have been resolved.

Class of 2013: Bloomberg's Babies Start Senior Year

In the first installment of a year-long series following members of the final graduating class under Michael Bloomberg, we meet two seniors whose high-school careers reflect the impact of the mayor's reforms.

DOE Diaspora: NYC School Vets Spread Reforms Nationwide

The impact of Mayor Bloomberg's education reforms is being felt well beyond New York as former DOE aides have taken top jobs in other cities and states.

Flat Gains on U.S. Tests Clash with Picture of Progress in NYC

New York school officials claim city students are making consistent gains, even in the face of national scores that suggest little progress over the past two years.

Can Private Advice Save A Threatened Public Realm?

From schools to public housing to hospitals that serve the poor, private firms are being brought in to rescue remnants of an earlier, more ambitious era of government.

The Principal Is New. The School Is Closing.

With new boss Dennis Walcott, the city school system gets a new chance to improve relations with parents and teachers. But there'll be no second chance for Robeson High in Bed-Stuy. What does that mean for students?

What Will It Take To Alter
Makeup of Top Schools?

Efforts to raise the achievement of students of color, and increase their admissions into the city's competitive high schools, have seen limited success.

THE CITY'S LATEST
HIRINGS AND RETIRINGS

Personnel changes abound in Albany as one governor leaves and another arrives, while city and nonprofit agencies also make moves.

Turn On, Tune In, Stay In:
Lowering The Dropout Rate

From beyond the DOE, advocates offer ideas about how to get more students to graduation.

THE CITY'S LATEST HIRINGS AND RETIRINGS

New people in old city government positions and brand-new ones, plus moves at Iris House, the Blood Center and more.

UNION TAKES A DAY OFF WORK
FOR INTROSPECTION ON ABUSE

An ounce of domestic violence prevention may do a pound of good for each and every Verizon worker who’s a member of CWA Local 1106.

NEW HOME FOR GIBBS

Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Linda Gibbs named deputy mayor for health and human services.

MAYOR TO KEEP AIDS SERVICES CITY-RUN, EYES REORGANIZATION

To the relief of the AIDS community, Mayor Bloomberg agreed not to contract out AIDS services as part of a preliminary budget deal with the Council last week-but his plan to shuffle around oversight of those services continues to keep advocates on edge.

SCHOOL BOARD GROWS TIRED OF ITSELF, REQUESTS DISMISSAL

Attempting to head off the state legislature’s own conclusions on the future of school governance in the Big Apple, the school board in one of the city’s top-ranked districts plans to weigh in this week, and ask that all local boards, itself included, be disbanded.

BIG VAC ATTACK

City agencies are supposed to help applicants register to vote, but weak regulations mean the Mayor can subvert the process.


City Limits provides in-depth stories on the schools, education policy and ideas, colleges, and jobs, opportunities, and upcoming events.




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BLOG ENTRIES

Beyond Elites, College Readiness Is Low - Helen Zelon

In his annual address, Mayor Bloomberg touted increased college readiness in the city's high schools. But more than half the students deemed college ready attend New York's top-ranked facilities.

Closing Schools More Poor, Less White - Jarrett Murphy

Schools the Bloomberg administration has targeted for closure have student populations demographically different from the average facility. And many had absorbed an increasing number of struggling students.

Searching For Stability At Robeson High - City Limits

Watch a video interview about the challenges confronting one Brooklyn High School: A dwindling student population, reduced class offerings and the third principal in about a year.

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EVENTS

The Twists and Turns of Green-Wood

Saturday, April 19, 2014
1:00p - 3:00p

Orvis Offers Free Fly Fishing Lessons in NYC

Saturday, April 19, 2014
10:00a - 12:00p

The Master Class Room at The Writers Room

Monday, April 21, 2014
06:00p - 08:00p

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CONVERSATIONS/OPINONS

Support And Advice For Chancellor Dennis Walcott

By Pedro Noguera

Support And Advice For Chancellor Dennis Walcott

New York’s public schools don’t need a savior or a superman. We need a leader with the maturity and vision to draw on the talent and resources in this city.

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MULTIMEDIA

The Stealth War

The laws that keep housing affordable for more than 2.5 million New Yorkers expire this month. Gov. Pataki says he wants to keep rent regulations alive. That's why tenants still have plenty to fear.

New York City's Agencies by Race/Ethnic Breakdown

A judge has scolded New York City for failing to address discrimination at the Fire Department, which is one—but far from the only—city agency with a racial skew. City Limits has compiled a chart, based on December 2009 data, that highlights the racial breakdown of New York City's agencies.

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PHOTO SLIDESHOWS

Beyond CityTime

An Investigation of Private Consultants in the Bloomberg Administration

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